peeks at the world through my lens

Lighting

Nightmares

Ladderlightlayersdupflattened 1Have you ever had one of those REALLY scary nightmares that you were certain was not a dream?


Supervised by God’s Architect

f/3.5 ISO 100 Nikkor 10-24 @10mm

f/3.5 ISO 100 Nikkor 10-24 @10mm

God’s Architect, Antoni Gaudí, appears to have designed this window to allow him to look down from the heavens and offer divine inspiration to those constructing his masterpiece.

Young Gaudí was a well groomed man with a penchant for expensive suits, gourmet food, and the theater. As he grew older, he became increasingly more devoted to his profession and less concerned with grooming and the fine life. He ate more frugally, dressed in old, worn-out suits, and neglected his appearance to the point where people thought he was a street beggar.  In fact, on June 7th, 1926, Gaudí was taking his routine stroll to a local church when he was hit by a street car. People passing assumed from his appearance that he was homeless, and no authorities were contacted until it was too late. He later died after ultimately being transported by taxi to a local hospital.


Ponte Vecchio Bridge, Florence (Firenze) Italy

f/11 ISO 400 1/250 55mm

First, I want tho say that IT’S GREAT to be back. I have been “offline” for quite some time and have neglected this blog that I had come to enjoy so much. I had some pesky cervical spine discs that decided to herniate over the years, and finally they got the best of me. Pretty much anything, even computer time, became an unbearable “pain on the neck” (and back, shoulder, arm, and hand).  Also,  carrying a bag as light as a camera bag was too much. The offending discs have since been removed, and I now have three fused vertebrae in my neck to show for it all!  I just got clearance to carry more that a few kg, so hopefully carrying the camera will keep me motivated to pick up again with the blog.

This is a shot of the Ponte Veccio Bridge over the River Arno in Firenze (Florence) Italy. My wife and I visited for a few days last summer, and had a fantastically fun and romantic trip to the “Cradle of the Renaissance “. As Rick Steve’s says, Florence is a “Super Market Sweep”, and the groceries are the best Renaissance art in Europe! (and home of Italy’s best gelato! ). I was most focused on a tour of as many Michelangelo’s works as I could see, which Florence hosts many.

This is an HDR that I created from one source image. Three copies were created at 2 f-stops intervals,  merged with Photomatix,  and tuned in Aperture.

 

 

 

 

 


Portrait Lighting for Photography

One of the aspects of photography that I know very little about is lighting. I recently purchased a really nice flashgun for my camera, the Nikon SB700. At first I had a little buyers remorse after spending so much $$ on a flash, but the more I read about it and especially USE IT, the more I really love it. It has already made a difference in my shots, even in the limited time that I have played with it.

So now that I have this awesome flash, it is time to pour through YouTube and REALLY learn how to use it . In doing so, I have picked up quite a few pointers on lighting in general, especially basic theory and layout for simple portrait lighting. I came across this great instructional video on portrait lighting basics by TheSlantedLens, and thought that I would pass it on to the blog-o-spere. In the video, Jay P. Margan demonstrates 5 different types of Portrait lighting:

  • Rembrant Light
  • Split Light
  • Broad Light
  • Butterfly Light
  • Loop Light

 

Take notes and let him know if u like it!

I will try to post some shots using the new flash soon, maybe even some attempts at portrait lighting!

Portrait Lighting for Photography and Video! – YouTube.