peeks at the world through my lens

Posts tagged “christianity

Passion Facade of Sagrada Família, Barcelona

Jesus

Details of the bronze “Gospel Door” at the Passion Facade of the Sagrada Família Basilica, Antoni Gaudí’s masterpice in Barcelona.

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Erongo Mountains to the Damaralands D6

The Day 6 Namibian agenda called for us to drive out from the Erongo mountains and head into the scenic Damaraland, a massive, untamed, and ruggedly beautiful region in the north-central part of Namibia which is home to one of the oldest nations in cultures in Namibia, the Damara people. Our Damaraland landscape starts with open plains and grasslands, granite hills and deep gorges, but changes dramatically to endless sandy wastelands. Somehow, though, the Damaraland is able to sustain a wide-ranging variety of animals which have all adapted to survive in this harsh and almost waterless desert. Two notable sites along the way were The Brandenburg  aka “Fire Mountain”, Namibia’s highest mountain, as well as a tour of the San (Bushman) rock art in Twyfelfontein, a site that has been inhabited for 6,000 years and was used for a place of worship and a site to conduct shamist rituals.  Throughout the rituals, at least 2,500 items of rock carvings have been created, and as one of the largest concentrations of rock art in Africa, has been designated an UNESCO World Heritage Site. Click to enlarge.

 

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Himba woman in traditional clothing

 

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The Brandberg ‘Fire Mountain’, from the effect created by the setting of the sun on its western face, which causes it to glow red like molten metal.

 

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Twyfelfontein, one of the most extensive galleries of rock art in Africa.

 

 

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Springbok grazing at dusk (one of my favorite pics from the trip)

 

7. Scorpian at Aabadi Camp

Welcome to Aabadi campsite, guys!

 

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Sunset over the Damaraland

 

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Sundowner at Bulls’s Party, Namibia D5

Our second hike on day 5 sent us straight into a rainstorm as it rumbled towards our afternoon sundowner (happy hour) destination, Bull’s Party rock formation. Bull’s Party formation stems from regional volcanic activity dating back 110-130 million years, followed by erosion of the earth’s surface, which resulted in massive granite blocks being exposed throughout the area. Millions of years of extreme day/night temperature fluctuations caused the blocks to chip off and form rounded boulders, which rolled down into the valley. The formation gets its name from the belief that the boulders resemble a group of bulls facing each other.

We enjoyed our anti-malarial Gin and tonics under cover of the massive granite boulders as the sky opened up and torrential rains created streams and waterfalls where seconds earlier there were none. The Gin Gods were smiling down on us though… for the rains ended as abruptly as they began, and, as the sun set below the clouds, our surroundings were illuminated by an unearthly yellow-orange hue. As we left the protection of the rocks and headed back to camp, the intense colors made it feel as  though we were walking across a Martian landscape. As the eerie colors faded, the clouds gave way to the last rays of the sun and a magical perfect double rainbow over the Elephant Head cliff formation.  As always, click to enlarge.

 

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Baboons taking shelter from the approaching storm

 

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Bull’s Party Panorama

 

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Taking our medicine: anti-malarial Gin and tonics

 

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Walking on Mars

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Elephant Head cliff formation


Erongo Mountains, Namibia D5

 

Day 5 in Namibia found us setting out at sunrise on a hike through the Erongo plains to visit Phillipps Cave, a shallow cave hidden in the steep granite cliffs of the Erongo mountains. The cave, which is a national heritage site, is famous for it’s cave paintings by the nomadic San People (Bushman), which include hunting scenes, antelopes, giraffes, rhinos, ostriches, antelope, springbuck, kudus, zebra, the famous white elephant, and 6 imprints of human hands. Some of the paintings date back to approximately 3368 BC. As always, click to enlarge.

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Sunrise Hike to the Cave

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Man Hunting Ostrich

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Antelope

White Elephant

White Elephant.

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Men Standing in Cave

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Man Sitting in Cave

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Family Sitting in Cave

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View from Phillipps Cave

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Stone tools dating to 3500 years BC,

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View from Phillipps Cave

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Bearded Dragon protecting the cave

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Ants drying their grass seed harvest, a morning ritual.

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Greater Kudu

Female Greater Kudu welcoming us on our return to camp

 

 

 

 


Grossmünster Church, Zürich.

Grossmünster

The Grossmünster church is a Romanesque-style Protestant church dating back to the 12th century. The twin towers of the Grossmünster are considered two of Zürich’s most recognized landmarks. Construction began around 1100 and the church was inaugurated around 1220. According to legend, the Grossmünster was founded by Charlemagne, whose horse fell to its knees over the tombs of Felix and Regula, Zürich’s two patron saints. Charlemagne thus had a church built as a monastery on the spot.

This long exposure shot (~2 min) of the church looks across the Münsterbrücke, a pedestrian and road bridge dating back to 1836 which spans the Limmat river.

 

 

 


Water Breathing Dragons in Zürich

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Details of the Swiss sculptor Richard Kissling statue created in 1889 in honor of Alfred Escher, a renowned Zurich politician and entrepreneur.


Obergefell v. Hodges

On April 28, 2015, the US Supreme Court heard arguments in Obergefell v. Hodges over whether gay marriage was guaranteed by the Constitution, and whether or not gay marriages legalized in other states must be recognized in states which ban the practice. The Court subsequently ruled that gay marriage is a constitutional right, making it legal in all 50 states, and that all existing bans are invalid. Here are just a few of the demonstrators who rallied in front of the Supreme Court as it heard these historic argument.

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